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Treatment of neurological disorders with traditional Chinese veterinary medicine

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Abstract

Traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM) includes acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicines, (manual therapy) and food therapy. This chapter looks at acupoints and channels, Chinese herbal medicines, conventional and TCVM pattern diagnoses, the evolution of TCVM, TCVM treatment of neurological disorders.

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Figures

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26.1 A ventrolateral view of the locations and commonly treated acupoints of the lung (LU), large intestine (LI), stomach (ST), spleen (SP), heart (HT), small intestine (SI), triple heater (TH) and gallbladder (GB) channels of a dog. Acupoints are numbered consecutively from the beginning of the channel to the end. All of these channels are bilateral. Chinese herbs produce their effects through one or more of these channels. LIV = liver; PC = pericardium. (Reprinted with permission from The Chi Institute, Reddick, FL, www.tcvm.com)
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26.2 A ventral and medial view of the locations and commonly treated acupoints of the pericardium (PC), medial heart (HT), stomach (ST), spleen (SP), kidney (KID), liver (LIV) and conception vessel (CV) channels of a dog. Acupoints are numbered consecutively from the beginning of the channel to the end. All these channels are bilateral except for the conception vessel, which courses along the ventral midline. Chinese herbs produce their effects through one or more of these channels. (Reprinted with permission from The Chi Institute, Reddick, FL, www.tcvm.com)
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26.3 A dorsolateral view of the locations and commonly treated acupoints of the bladder (BL), gallbladder (GB) and governing vessel (GV) channels. Acupoints are numbered consecutively from the beginning of the channel to the end. Throughout the thoracolumbar region the bladder channel has two lines one more medial to the other. The bladder and gallbladder channels are bilateral and the governing vessel courses along the dorsal midline. Chinese herbs produce their effects through one or more of these channels. (Reprinted with permission from The Chi Institute, Reddick, FL, www.tcvm.com)
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26.4 Most acupoints are located beneath the dermis and subcutaneous regions at the fascia and muscle interface near neurovascular connective tissue bundles or motor points. Some of the effects of acupuncture are associated with sensory nerve stimulation that evokes reflexes via somatic motor and autonomic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) nerves. Systemic effects are in part due to stimulation of ascending and descending pathways in the spinal cord and brain, which produce generalized neurohumoral effects. Illustration created by Allison L. Wright, MS, CMI, Athens, Georgia, USA.
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26.6 A 3-year-old neutered female Border Collie with intermittent uncontrollable seizures for the past year receiving dry needle acupuncture of acupoints known to control epilepsy and resolve her underlying TCVM pattern. Acupoints being treated that are visible in the picture (from cranial to caudal) are: the classical acupoints (bilateral, one-third of the distance along a line from the cranial edge of the ears and the lateral canthus of the eye), (on the midline at the cranial edge of the ears) and transpositional acupoints GV-20 (midline), GB-20 (bilateral), GV-14 (midline) and bilateral BL-17 and BL-18. The dog also received the Chinese herbal medicines and . Historically the dog was being treated with phenobarbital and potassium bromide at serum-confirmed therapeutic levels, but was still having partial seizures two or three times a month, lasting up to 30 minutes in duration. She was also sedated, ataxic and had lost her lust for life. The combination of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicines improved the seizure control and allowed a reduction in her anticonvulsant medication. The sedation and ataxia resolved and she returned to her normal personality and activity level.
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26.8 A 12-year-old neutered female Whippet with suspected cervical intervertebral disc disease receiving EA at GB-20/GB-21, SI-9/SI-16 and bilateral classical acupoints (between the cervical vertebrae, above and below the transverse processes) to relieve neck pain, and dry needle acupuncture of other acupoints to treat the underlying TCVM pattern that has caused insidiously progressive ataxia and tetraparesis of approximately 6–9 months’ duration. The dog also received the Chinese herbal medicines and Cervical Formula (www.tcvm.com) orally twice daily and occasional for pain if needed. The dog has never received corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or other conventional pain medication. With EA every 4–6 weeks and the Chinese herbal medicines, the pain is controlled and the neurological deficits have improved to a mild intermittent ataxia for the past year. The dog has an excellent quality of life and further diagnostic tests or surgical intervention have not been required. (See also clip on DVD)
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26.9 An 8-year-old neutered male Shar Pei with acute paraplegia from a suspected L1–L2 fibrocartilaginous embolism of the spinal cord, diagnosed with MRI, receiving EA. Acupoints visible in the picture include the classical acupoints (midline at the lumbosacral space) and (in the intervertebral space just lateral to the midline) and transpositional acupoints BL-54 and BL-23. Other acupoints were treated with EA, dry needle acupuncture and aqua-acupuncture and and physical therapy were also administered. The dog received a modification of the herbal formula (Double P II (www.tcvm.com)) orally twice daily. By 4 months after the onset of clinical signs, the dog was ambulatory with residual slightly decreased conscious proprioception greater on the left than right side. (Reprinted with permission from: Medina C (2010) An integrative approach for the treatment of suspected fibrocartilaginous embolism of the spinal cord in a dog. (2), 55–60)
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26.10 An 11-year-old neutered female Greyhound treated with EA for a chronic progressive upper motor neuron paraparesis from a T13–L1 type II intervertebral disc protrusion and lethargy. Visible acupoints treated included GV-20/ (midline lumbosacral space), BL-21/BL-21, BL-22/BL-22, BL-23/23 and BL-62/KID3/BL-62/KID-3. Other acupoints were treated to resolve the underlying TCVM pattern. With monthly EA treatment, her paraparesis and attitude improved and conventional drug therapy and surgery were avoided.

Supplements

Acupuncture

This is a 12-year-old neutered female Whippet originally presented with a history of insidiously progressive ataxia and weakness in all four limbs and intermittent neck pain of approximately 6 months’ duration. For the past year, with monthly electro-acupuncture (EA) and twice-daily Chinese herbal medicine; she no longer has pain or quadriparesis and retains only an intermittent mild ataxia. Acupuncture needles (22 G, 25 mm) are inserted into classical acupoints Jian jia ji located above and below the transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae in the area of the cervical branches of the spinal nerves, as well as acupoints on the small intestine and gallbladder channels that transverse the neck. In the video, pairs of acupuncture needles can be seen connected via alligator clips and wires to an electronic acupunctoscope delivering 20 cycles/s (Hz) and 3 mA electricity for 15 minutes, and then 15 minutes alternating between 80 Hz and 120 Hz, 3 mA. The dog is also receiving EA on her lumbar region (L2–L3) and dry needle acupuncture (acupuncture needles with no electricity) of other acupoints of her back and thoracic and pelvic limbs to treat the underlying traditional Chinese veterinary medicine pattern that caused her initial signs. The dog is neither restrained nor sedated. After she adjusts to the slight tingling sensations and muscle contractions on her neck muscles, she lays her head down and rests quietly. Many dogs sleep during their acupuncture session. (See pages 502 and 505 in the Manual)

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