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The Journal of Small Animal Practice (JSAP)

The Journal of Small Animal Practice (JSAP) is the BSAVA's monthly scientific journal, featuring original, peer-reviewed articles, case reports and other scientific and educational information from around the world. The aim of JSAP is to facilitate the dissemination and implementation of new ideas and techniques relating to clinical veterinary practice, and ultimately to promote best practice.

JSAP is provided to BSAVA members as part of their membership benefits. Members - to access JSAP, log in then click on the 'read latest issues' button that appears below. 

You can search for JSAP articles from within the BSAVA Library by clicking on the JSAP tab from the search results page. If you are a BSAVA member and already logged in, you can click through from the search results to access the full article. 

Want to read JSAP on the move? Download the new Wiley Online Library app - Find out more

November issue - in JSAP this month

A new study, published in the latest issue of the Journal of Small Animal Practice (JSAP), aimed to investigate how primary care clinicians in the UK approach initial management of canine generalised epileptic seizures, including factors potentially associated with prescription and choice of anti-seizure drugs. The study “Approach to initial management of canine generalised epileptic seizures in primary-care veterinary practices in the United Kingdom” utilised the Small Animal Veterinary Surveillance Network to review electronic health records equating to 3,150,713 consultations (917,373 dogs) from 224 veterinary practices. Anti-seizure drugs following a single epileptic seizure were rarely prescribed, in accordance with International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations. Less than half of dogs initially presenting with cluster seizures were prescribed anti-seizure drugs. Imepitoin was frequently selected in the treatment of cluster seizures despite no authorisation for this purpose. Nicola Di Girolamo, Editor of JSAP concluded: “Studies like this one are instrumental to understand how primary care clinicians comply with current recommendations. Additional efforts may be required to fully adhere to the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations; being aware of these gaps is the first step towards improvement.”

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October issue - in JSAP this month

Study evaluates quick sequential organ failure assessment score in dogs with severe sepsis and septic shock

The rapid detection of sepsis in the emergency room may allow early intervention, which may result in improved survival rate among septic patients. The diagnosis of sepsis is very complex and there is no single test, examination finding, or scoring system that is a reliable indicator. The prognostic and diagnostic performance of quick sequential organ failure assessment in dogs with severe sepsis and septic shock has not been evaluated before. The study aim was to evaluate the prognostic utility and performance of a quick sequential organ failure assessment score to diagnose severe sepsis or septic shock in dogs presented to an emergency service. The quick sequential organ failure score was calculated by evaluating respiratory rate (>22 breaths per minute), arterial systolic blood pressure (≤100mmHg) and altered mentation. It was found that the quick sequential organ failure assessment score provided poor discrimination between survivors and non-survivors for dogs with severe sepsis and septic shock. Considering the results of this study, it may not be possible to identify a single scoring system that serves the purpose that quick sequential organ failure assessment is intended for. Nicola Di Girolamo, Editor of JSAP concluded: “The results of this study have strong clinical implications. The JSAP values studies with negative findings such as this one, as much as studies with positive findings. The fact that a diagnostic tool or a treatment does not reach the desired objective, should not hinder publication of methodologically sound research”.

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You must be logged in and a BSAVA member (excluding veterinary nurse student member) to use the links

A collection of JSAP reviews for primary care practice is freely available to all.

If you are not a member of BSAVA and wish to receive JSAP, you can either become a member or subscribe to the journal via our publisher, Wiley.

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