1887

Management of reproduction and related disorders

image of Management of reproduction and related disorders
GBP
Online Access: GBP25.00 + VAT
BSAVA Library Pass Buy a pass

Abstract

This chapter will focus on the management of the most important issues related to reproduction in feline practice, notably suppression of oestrus, and management of pregnancy, parturition and postpartum problems in the queen. Care of the neonate and management of common neonatal disorders are also discussed. : Diagnosing and managing dystocia.

Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap15

Figures

Image of 15.2
15.2 One of the first physical indications of feline pregnancy is ‘pinking’ of the nipples, which occurs approximately 15–18 days after ovulation.
Image of 15.3
15.3 Radiography is useful for determining the number of fetuses present, by counting the number of skulls visible. This late-gestation queen is carrying five fetuses. (Reprinted from Little S (2012) with the permission of Elsevier.)
Image of Deciduous incisors and canines appear at about 3–4 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon)
Deciduous incisors and canines appear at about 3–4 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon) Deciduous incisors and canines appear at about 3–4 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon)
Image of Kittens have blue irises until the adult eye colour appears at 4–6 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon)
Kittens have blue irises until the adult eye colour appears at 4–6 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon) Kittens have blue irises until the adult eye colour appears at 4–6 weeks of age. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon)
Image of 15.4
15.4 Kittens should be placed in sternal recumbency, with the head elevated to simulate a normal nursing position, when bottle-fed. (Courtesy of Chantal Bourdon)
Image of 15.5
15.5 Cells for vaginal cytology are collected by gently rotating a saline-moistened cotton-tipped swab on the dorsal wall of the vagina about 1 cm from the vulvar entrance. A human urethral swab is smaller and often easier to use in the queen than a standard cotton-tipped swab. The procedure is brief and painless and does not require sedation. The swab is then rolled on a microscope slide to deposit the cells and the smear is air-dried. It can then be stained with any product used to stain blood films. Use of a trichrome stain will colour cells containing keratin red and cells without keratin will appear blue. Superficial cells predominate in this vaginal cytology smear, made during oestrus in the queen. These cells have been stained with Harris–Schorr stain, which colours keratin red. (Courtesy of Elise Malandain; reprinted from Little S (2012) with permission from Elsevier.)
Image of 15.6
15.6 Mammary hyperplasia in a young lategestation pregnant queen. A litter of kittens was born 12 days later. The queen was initially treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate and a fluoroquinolone, as well as tramadol, until the kittens were born. Therapy with cabergoline was then initiated and the tramadol was replaced by a fentanyl patch. The kittens were hand-reared, both because the queen refused to allow nursing due to pain and because cabergoline caused the milk supply to dry up within a few days. The same queen approximately 2 months later, after OHE, showing normal mammary tissue. (Courtesy of Dr Shelagh Morrison; reprinted from Little S (2012) with permission from Elsevier.)
Image of 15.7
15.7 Pyometra may produce segmental uterine enlargement. In this case each uterine horn contains a large pocket of fluid. This could mimic a fetus on abdominal palpation but not on ultrasonography. (Reprinted from Little S (2012) with the permission of Elsevier.)
Image of 15.8
15.8 Radiography may demonstrate uterine enlargement in queens with pyometra, though it may not rule out pregnancy. In this case the uterus is severely enlarged and fills most of the abdomen but no fetal mineralization is seen as would be expected for the size of the uterus, suggesting that it is enlarged due to fluid accumulation and possible pyometra. (Reprinted from Little S (2012) with the permission of Elsevier.)
Image of 15.9
15.9 Typical ultrasonographic findings in queens with pyometra are an enlarged uterus with convoluted tubular horns, as in this case. The uterine horns may also be filled with flocculent material of variable echogenicity. (Reprinted from Little S (2012) with the permission of Elsevier.)
Image of Untitled

More like this

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap15
dcterms_title,dcterms_description
-contentType:Journal
5
5
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error