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Regurgitation

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Abstract

Regurgitation is the retrograde passive expulsion of undigested food, water and/or salivawithout any obvious effort. This chapters covers the following: causes, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach and treatment.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap5_32

Figures

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5.32.1 Endoscopic appearance of the oesophagus of a cat with severe oesophagitis following ingestion, and incomplete swallowing into the stomach, of a doxycycline tablet. In addition to the ulceration and bleeding (white arrows), fibrinous strands (black arrows) are seen crossing the oesophageal lumen, and a free flap of mucosa (green arrow) is seen draping into the lumen. These fibrinous strands and flap of mucosa indicate that this cat is at risk of developing an oesophageal stricture. (Courtesy of The Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
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5.32.3 Narrow oesophageal stricture in a cat following severe oesophagitis; the small lumen is just visible (arrowed). The cause of the stricture was not known but it was believed to be secondary to severe untreated oesophagitis due to gastro-oesophageal reflux during general anaesthesia. (Courtesy of The Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
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5.32.4 Postural feeding in a 17-week-old Siamese kitten with pyloric dyssynergia (also known as pyloric stenosis) with associated megaoesophagus. Pyloric dyssynergia is a condition seen most commonly in young Siamese cats and is often associated with concurrent megaoesophagus; the dyssynergia is due to abnormal pyloric function rather than a mechanical stenosis. Medical treatment with prokinetic agents (e.g. metoclopramide or ranitidine) can be tried, or surgical pyloroplasty. The cause of the megaoesophagus is not known, but it can resolve following effective treatment of the pyloric dyssynergia. This kitten was fed a low-fat high-protein diet – to encourage weight gain – alongside medical management with metoclopramide. (Courtesy of The Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)

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