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Respiratory disorders

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Abstract

Respiratory disorders in backyard poultry tend not to be problems that affect single birds, but diseases that affect the whole flock. This chapter covers the epidemiology, aetiology and pathogenesis, clinical signs, differential diagnosis, post-mortem findings, laboratory diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of a wide range of respiratory diseases in poultry.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443194.chap15

Figures

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15.4 Severe sinusitis in a laying hen due to infectious bronchitis. (© Clinic for Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish, JLU Giessen)
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15.5 Post-mortem view of ovarian cysts (arrowed) in a laying hen due to infectious bronchitis. (© Michael Lierz)
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15.6 Endoscopic view of severe tracheitis due to infectious laryngotracheitis in a laying hen. Note the swollen, red appearance of the mucosa indicating inflammation. (© Michael Lierz)
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15.7 Post-mortem view of severe fibrinous tracheitis due to infectious laryngotracheitis in a laying hen. The mucosal membrane is completely coated with a diphtheritic membrane material. (© Clinic for Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish, JLU Giessen)
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15.8 Severe oedema of the head in a turkey. Avian metapneumovirus is a likely cause. (© Clinic for Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish, JLU Giessen)
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15.9 Severe general clinical signs, such as sleepiness and ruffled feathers, combined with sinusitis in a broiler chick caused by avian paramyxovirus infection. (© Clinic for Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish, JLU Giessen)
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15.10 Fibrinopurulent sinusitis in a turkey chick due to a low pathogenic avian influenza virus infection. (© Lierz & Hafez, FU Berlin)
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15.11 Severe conjunctivitis in a goose due to infection. (© Clinic for Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish, JLU Giessen)
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15.12 Dwarfism in a chick (right) compared with a normal chick (left) at the time of hatching due to a vertical infection. (© Michael Lierz)
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15.13 Fried-egg appearance of a colony on a specific agar after isolation. (© Michael Lierz)
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15.14 Post-mortem view of severe fibrinopurulent air sacculitis due to infection. Note the presence of caseous material. A similar appearance is seen with infection. (© Lierz & Hafez, FU Berlin)
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15.15 Endoscopic view of caseous material on the air sac membrane and liver capsule as a result of a bacterial infection. In such cases, and are the most likely pathogens. (© Michael Lierz)
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15.16 Post-mortem view of severe fibrinopurulent pneumonia with caseous material in the lung. In this case, infection was confirmed as the cause. (© Lierz & Hafez, FU Berlin)
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15.17 Endoscopic view of the air sac membranes coated with grey granulomas. Upon closer inspection, the mould appearance of the granulomas is clearly visible, indicating aspergillosis. (© Michael Lierz)

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