1887

Diagnosis of protozoal and arthropod-borne diseases

image of Diagnosis of protozoal and arthropod-borne diseases
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Abstract

Protozoal and arthropod-borne infections cause important diseases in dogs and cats. Some diseases, particularly arthropod-borne, are endemic to some areas because they are transmitted by vectors restricted by geographical boundaries. However, these diseases are frequently also presented in non-endemic areas as a result of the travel and importation of animals. In addition, some of these diseases are zoonotic and, therefore, of public health concern. This chapter looks at general laboratory diagnosis of protozoal and arthropod-borne diseases and diagnostic tests for specific disease. Case examples are included.

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Figures

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29.2 Immunohistochemical labelling of in a skin section from a dog with leishmaniosis. Note the amastigotes stained brown within the cytoplasm of macrophages (arrowed). (Original magnification X200). (Courtesy of Laura Ordeix, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain)
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29.3 Blood smear from a dog showing in three erythrocytes (arrowed). (Giemsa stain; original magnification X400). (Courtesy of Drs Caldin and Furlanello, San Marco Veterinary Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.4 Blood smear from a dog showing morula in a monocyte (arrowed). (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000)
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29.5 Blood smear from a cat showing on the surface of erythrocytes. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X200). (Courtesy of Drs Caldin and Furlanello, San Marco Veterinary Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.7 Blood smear from a dog showing in a neutrophil (arrowed). (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000). (Courtesy of Drs Caldin and Furlanello, San Marco Veterinary Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.8 Blood smear from a dog showing in a platelet (arrowed). (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000)
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29.9 Microfilaria of in canine blood. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X400)
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29.10 Bone marrow smear from a dog showing amastigotes within a macrophage. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000). (Courtesy of Drs Caldin and Furlanello, San Marco Veterinary Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.11 A dog with leishmaniosis manifesting typical facial exfoliative dermatitis.
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29.12 Feline blood smear; note the small-form piroplasms within the erythrocytes ( spp., arrowed). (Modified Wright’s stain; original magnification X1000). (Courtesy of Drs Carli, Caldin and Furlanello, Veterinary San Marco Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.13 Canine blood smear; note gamont of within a neutrophil in the feathered edge. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000)
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29.14 Feline blood smear; note gamont of within a neutrophil. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000)
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29.15 Bone marrow smear showing tachyzoites. (Giemsa stain; original magnification X1000). (Courtesy of Drs Caldin and Furlanello, Veterinary lSan Marco Laboratory, Padua, Italy)
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29.16 Cutaneous lesions in a 4-year-old mixed breed dog.
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29.17(a–b) Cytology of the fine-needle aspirate from the right popliteal lymph node. (Diff-Quik stain; original magnification (a) X20, (b) X40). (Courtesy of Antonio Melendez, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain)
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29.18 Histopathological appearance of bone marrow. (Haematoxylin and eosin stain; original magnification X40)

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