1887

Initial management in captivity

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Abstract

Wildlife casualties generally arrive at the veterinary clinic with little or no prior warning. Consequently, ideal accommodation, food and other resources may not be immediately available. However, all veterinary clinics should have the basic equipment, drugs, fluids and nutrition required to stabilize a wildlife casualty. This chapter outlines these requirements for the range of wildlife species a British veterinary clinic may encounter.

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Figures

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7.1 Badgers () can be temporarily housed in large secure dog kennels for initial treatment, but will need to be moved to larger pens for longer-term hospitalization.
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7.2 Nests can be made out of towels for young or debilitated birds such as this fledgling raven (). (© Jenna Richardson)
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7.3 Padded bedding should be used to prevent keel damage in recumbent patients such as this mute swan (. (© Secret World Wildlife Rescue)
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7.5 Foxes can carry the zoonotic parasite , as shown in this cub with patchy alopecia, scaling and crusting.
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7.6 Hedgehogs often harbour ringworm () with alopecia and crusty lesions typically around the face, as shown here.
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7.8 Hedgehogs should be offered dog or cat food for short-term feeding. This is a leucistic individual, which is a rare colour variation in the UK and would be particularly susceptible to predation.
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7.9 Young red kite () being tempted to eat with chopped up day-old chicks.
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7.10 High tick burdens, as shown in this hedgehog, are not uncommon, especially in debilitated animals.
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7.11 All patients should be weighed on admission and at regular intervals throughout their time in hospital. Small digital scales may be required, as for this immature field vole ().

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