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Preventive medicine in the shelter environment

image of Preventive medicine in the shelter environment
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on the control of infectious and parasitic diseases using vaccines and pharmaceutical products, with particular attention paid to flea control and the rational approach to endoparasites. These forms of disease control are vital to the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to infectious pathogens. Quick reference guide: Intake assessment for animals entering shelters.

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Figures

Image of 11.1
11.1 Vaccines are a vital part of preventive medicine. (Reproduced from the )
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11.2 Most vaccinations for companion animals are given subcutaneously. (Courtesy of MSD Animal Health)
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11.3 Intranasal vaccination is one method of stimulating mucosal immunity. (Courtesy of MSD Animal Health)
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11.7 The fall in maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) is depicted by the solid line. As MDA interferes with the response to vaccination, the final vaccination is timed to coincide with the expected decline in MDA to a point where a response is possible. The period between the decline in MDA to non-protective levels and vaccinal immunity developing is known as the . Animals exposed to infection during this period will not be protected. (Reproduced from the )
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11.8 Flea biology and life cycle. (Reproduced from the )
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11.10 tapeworm.
Image of Every animal admitted to a shelter should go through an intake process.
Every animal admitted to a shelter should go through an intake process. Every animal admitted to a shelter should go through an intake process.
Image of New arrivals waiting to be assessed by shelter staff.
New arrivals waiting to be assessed by shelter staff. New arrivals waiting to be assessed by shelter staff.
Image of Posters can be a handy reminder of the important health checks that should be completed as part of the intake process.
Posters can be a handy reminder of the important health checks that should be completed as part of the intake process. Posters can be a handy reminder of the important health checks that should be completed as part of the intake process.
Image of All animals should be thoroughly examined by a veterinary surgeon or nurse upon entering a shelter. (© Rachel Dean)
All animals should be thoroughly examined by a veterinary surgeon or nurse upon entering a shelter. (© Rachel Dean) All animals should be thoroughly examined by a veterinary surgeon or nurse upon entering a shelter. (© Rachel Dean)
Image of Test kits, such as these for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), can be used to screen for infectious diseases in animals being admitted to the shelter. (© Rachel Dean)
Test kits, such as these for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), can be used to screen for infectious diseases in animals being admitted to the shelter. (© Rachel Dean) Test kits, such as these for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), can be used to screen for infectious diseases in animals being admitted to the shelter. (© Rachel Dean)
Image of The bodyweight and body condition of animals upon arrival should be assessed and recorded as part of the intake process. (© Rachel Dean)
The bodyweight and body condition of animals upon arrival should be assessed and recorded as part of the intake process. (© Rachel Dean) The bodyweight and body condition of animals upon arrival should be assessed and recorded as part of the intake process. (© Rachel Dean)
Image of A microchip being implanted in a dog prior to rehoming. (© Rachel Dean)
A microchip being implanted in a dog prior to rehoming. (© Rachel Dean) A microchip being implanted in a dog prior to rehoming. (© Rachel Dean)
Image of Vaccinations for (a) dogs and (b) cats should be administered in accordance with practice policy.
Vaccinations for (a) dogs and (b) cats should be administered in accordance with practice policy. Vaccinations for (a) dogs and (b) cats should be administered in accordance with practice policy.

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