1887

Skin diseases in shelter animals

image of Skin diseases in shelter animals
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Abstract

Skin disease is common in cats and dogs, and can be a reason for relinquishment, abandonment, or even consideration for euthanasia. However, many dermatological conditions are very amenable to diagnosis and effective treatment within the shelter without marked expense. This chapter will describe dermatological problems of particular relevance in the shelter setting. Zoonotic diseases in shelters; Dealing with the itchy dog: is it atopic dermatitis?; Exotic diseases in shelters.

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Figures

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16.4 Alopecia, scale and papules in canine scabies.
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16.5 Eggs of in a skin scraping preparation.
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16.6 Alopecia and erythema around the head and neck of a dog due to lice.
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16.7 Comedones and pyoderma in a dog with demodicosis.
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16.8 Deep pyoderma due to demodicosis.
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16.9 Grease, alopecia and erythema on the dorsum in infestation.
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16.10 .
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16.11 (a–e) The clinical signs of pyoderma.
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16.12 Eosinophilic plaque in a cat with deep pyoderma.
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16.13 A cat with ringworm. (© Cats Protection)
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16.14 Microscopic appearance of on an infected hair.
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16.16 Pedal saliva staining due to allergic dermatitis in a dog.
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16.17 Severe otitis in a dog with atopic dermatitis.
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16.18 Periocular alopecia, erythema and staining in a dog with atopic dermatitis.
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16.19 Barbered alopecia of the abdomen of a cat with flea allergy.
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16.20 Signs of facial pruritus in a cat with non-flea hypersensitivity disease.
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16.21 Eosinophilic granuloma (‘rodent ulcer’) affecting the lips of a cat.
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16.22 Non-healing wound in an FeLV-positive cat; the definitive cause was not identified. The haircoat on the ventral abdomen is stained by exudates. Cats with non-healing wounds should be tested for FIV and FeLV infections. Other differentials for non-healing wounds include atypical bacterial infections (e.g. spp.), fungal infections, neoplasia, foreign bodies and corticosteroid therapy. FeLV = feline leukaemia virus; FIV = feline immunodeficiency virus. (Reproduced from the )
Image of Child with ringworm caused by Microsporum canis. (© Richard Malik)
Child with ringworm caused by Microsporum canis. (© Richard Malik) Child with ringworm caused by . (© Richard Malik)
Image of Classical distribution of Sarcoptes scabiei in the dog.
Classical distribution of Sarcoptes scabiei in the dog. Classical distribution of in the dog.
Image of Severe cowpox in a cat. (© Conor O’Halloran)
Severe cowpox in a cat. (© Conor O’Halloran) Severe cowpox in a cat. (© Conor O’Halloran)
Image of Cat with a skin lesion caused by Mycobacterium microti.
Cat with a skin lesion caused by Mycobacterium microti. Cat with a skin lesion caused by .
Image of Cutaneous ulcers and exfoliative dermatitis in a dog infected with Leishmania spp.
Cutaneous ulcers and exfoliative dermatitis in a dog infected with Leishmania spp. Cutaneous ulcers and exfoliative dermatitis in a dog infected with spp. (Courtesy of M Saridomihelakis and reproduced from the ).
Image of Diagnosis of canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). a Biopsy is particularly important in older dogs, where epitheliotropic lymphoma may mimic atopic dermatitis. b Use the information gathered during this part of the work-up to design appropriate long-term microbial control measures.c Atopic dermatitis and food allergy may coexist.
Diagnosis of canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). a Biopsy is particularly important in older dogs, where epitheliotropic lymphoma may mimic atopic dermatitis. b Use the information gathered during this part of the work-up to design appropriate long-term microbial control measures.c Atopic dermatitis and food allergy may coexist. Diagnosis of canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). Biopsy is particularly important in older dogs, where epitheliotropic lymphoma may mimic atopic dermatitis. Use the information gathered during this part of the work-up to design appropriate long-term microbial control measures. Atopic dermatitis and food allergy may coexist.
Image of Map of the distribution of canine vector-borne diseases in Europe.
Map of the distribution of canine vector-borne diseases in Europe. Map of the distribution of canine vector-borne diseases in Europe.
Image of Map of the distribution of canine leishmaniosis in Europe.
Map of the distribution of canine leishmaniosis in Europe. Map of the distribution of canine leishmaniosis in Europe.

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