1887

Emergency management of respiratory distress

image of Emergency management of respiratory distress
GBP
Online Access: GBP25.00 + VAT
BSAVA Library Pass Buy a pass

Abstract

Respiratory distress is a life-threatening clinical syndrome that should be dealt with immediately. What is done in the initial approach to these animals can make the difference between life and death. This chapter covers initial assessment and stabilization, pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, diseases associated with respiratory distress and prolonged oxygen therapy. : Emergency tracheotomy.

Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443347.chap2

Figures

Image of 2.1
2.1 Algorithm for localization of the respiratory lesion in animals with respiratory distress. This chart should be used in conjunction with clinical judgement and experience to optimize assessment of the patient.
Image of 2.4
2.4 Nasal oxygen can be provided through a catheter inserted into one nostril to a premeasured length. (Reproduced from the
Image of 2.5
2.5 Nasal oxygen prongs for oxygen supplementation. (Reproduced from the
Image of 2.6
2.6 An oxygen cage in use. Reproduced from the
Image of Untitled
Image of For routine airway maintenance, a non-cuffed tube with an inner cannula, with an outer diameter no greater than 75% of the luminal diameter of the trachea, should be used.
For routine airway maintenance, a non-cuffed tube with an inner cannula, with an outer diameter no greater than 75% of the luminal diameter of the trachea, should be used. For routine airway maintenance, a non-cuffed tube with an inner cannula, with an outer diameter no greater than 75% of the luminal diameter of the trachea, should be used.
Image of For maintenance of anaesthesia or prolonged mechanical ventilation, a tube with an inner cannula and a high-volume low-pressure cuff is more appropriate.
For maintenance of anaesthesia or prolonged mechanical ventilation, a tube with an inner cannula and a high-volume low-pressure cuff is more appropriate. For maintenance of anaesthesia or prolonged mechanical ventilation, a tube with an inner cannula and a high-volume low-pressure cuff is more appropriate.
Image of Skin incision and incision between thyohyoid muscle bellies. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Skin incision and incision between thyohyoid muscle bellies. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission. Skin incision and incision between thyohyoid muscle bellies. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Incision between the sternohyoid muscle bellies. Gelpi retractors help to expose the trachea. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Incision between the sternohyoid muscle bellies. Gelpi retractors help to expose the trachea. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission. Incision between the sternohyoid muscle bellies. Gelpi retractors help to expose the trachea. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Stay sutures have been placed either side of the proposed annular ligament incision. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Stay sutures have been placed either side of the proposed annular ligament incision. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission. Stay sutures have been placed either side of the proposed annular ligament incision. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of The annular ligament incision is made big enough (but not greater than half way around the circumference of the trachea) to permit gentle placement of the tracheostomy tube. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
The annular ligament incision is made big enough (but not greater than half way around the circumference of the trachea) to permit gentle placement of the tracheostomy tube. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission. The annular ligament incision is made big enough (but not greater than half way around the circumference of the trachea) to permit gentle placement of the tracheostomy tube. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of The tube is secured and skin sutures placed. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
The tube is secured and skin sutures placed. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission. The tube is secured and skin sutures placed. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.

More like this

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443347.chap2
dcterms_title,dcterms_description
5
5
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error