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Ophthalmic pain

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Abstract

Recognition and effective treatment of ophthalmic pain may present the clinician with a challenge due to difficulties in patient assessment. Treatment relies on the recognition of pain followed by effective analgesia. This chapter discusses analgesia for enucleation, eyelid, corneal and deep ocular pain. Local anaesthetic techniques are described in depth. Bilateral lower lid entropion correction; Enucleation.

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Figures

Image of 7.12
7.12 A curved retrobulbar needle suitable for use in the dog.
Image of 7.13
7.13 A cross-sectional diagram of the orbit, globe and associated structures: 1 = globe; 2 = eyelids; 3 = needle placement for a retrobulbar injection; 4 = intraconal space; 5 = orbit; 6 = extraocular muscles, nerves and blood vessels; 7 = injection site for peribulbar block. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of 7.14
7.14 Injection site for a peribulbar block: 1 = eyelid; 2 = injection site in peribulbar tissue. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of 7.15
7.15 Injection site for a subtenon block: 1 = spatulated cannula used for injection; 2 = Tenon’s capsule; 3 = sclera; 4 = cornea. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.

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