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Core investigation and laboratory techniques

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Abstract

This chapter discusses key investigative techniques and lists the basic equipment for a dermatology ‘toolbox’.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443811.chap3

Figures

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3.3 Artery forceps can be used to pluck hair.
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3.4 Anagen and telogen bulbs on a hair pluck.
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3.5 Frayed hair tips due to self-inflicted trauma.
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3.6 spp. eggs on a hair pluck.
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3.7 mites found parallel to the hair shaft on a hair pluck.
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3.8 Adult (canine biting louse) on a tape strip.
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3.9 mites and eggs on a tape strip.
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3.10 Tape strip from skin, looped on to slide ready for staining.
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3.11 Direct impression smear from an exudative lesion.
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3.13 Deep skin scraping from an ear pinna showing capillary ooze.
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3.15 (a) mite and (b) mite eggs from a deep skin scraping.
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3.16 mites from a deep skin scraping.
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3.17 Fine-needle aspiration of a nodular lesion on a dog.
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3.20 Superficial pyoderma lesions. Only the primary pustule is suitable to be sampled for culture.
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3.24 Excisional biopsy is preferable for larger lesions.

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