1887

Aggression toward unfamiliar people and animals

image of Aggression toward unfamiliar people and animals
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Abstract

Canine aggression is a common complaint from owners and can lead to a serious public health risk, as well as liability, when unfamiliar people and dogs are involved. This chapter deals with societal effects of aggression, the behavioural biology of aggression, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, follow-up, prevention.

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Figures

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18.3 A dog that appears to be assertively aggressive. Note the vertical lip lift, elevated tail, forward body posture and piloerection.
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18.4 Dog displaying fearful behaviour. Note the drawn-back ears, dilated pupils and stiff body posture.
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18.5 Dogs being desensitized and counter-conditioned (DSCC) in a range of contexts. DSCC when away from home territory: position the dog off a pathway and give it a reinforcer (in this case a treat) when it is calm and focused on the owner while the stimulus (a child) goes by. DSCC for territorial aggression: position the dog in a place where it responds less (in this case in the driveway instead of inside the house) and give it a reinforcer (in this case a treat) when it is calm and focused on the owner while the stimulus goes by. Setting up for DSCC: have the owner and dog parallel to the area where the stimulus will pass by and have the dog in a sitting position; do not have either the owner’s or the dog’s back to the approaching stimulus, and have small treats in hand.

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