1887

Management of urinary tract disorders

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Abstract

This chapters considers the management of the most important urinary tract disorders that are encountered in feline practice, notably chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, urinary tract infections, feline idiopathic cystitis and urolithiasis. : Increasing water intake; Subcutaneous fluid therapy.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap13

Figures

Image of 13.1
13.1 Ultrasound image of the left kidney of a cat with CKD as a result of idiopathic hypercalcaemia. Shadowing from the renal pelvis can be seen due to a calcium oxalate nephrolith. This cat presented for investigation of polydipsia and weight loss. Hypercalcaemia and IRIS stage II CKD were identified. Medical management of both the hypercalcaemia and renal disease resulted in a clinical improvement. The nephroliths were monitored and remained a similar size until the cat’s death one year later due to recurrence of hypercalcaemia and progression of CKD. Removal of the nephroliths was not indicated in this case, as monitoring showed they were not causing an obstruction and management of the underlying cause (hypercalcaemia) was initially successful. Note that feline upper urinary tract (renal, ureteral) uroliths are more likely to be calcium oxalate than any other type.
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13.6 Approach to staging and management of chronic kidney disease. ACEi = ACE inhibitors.
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13.11 A cat with AKI with a ‘homemade’ closed urine collection system. This system includes a giving set and clean, empty intravenous fluid bag. Removal of the giving set’s ‘chamber’ section (as shown here) can reduce resistance to urine flow. It is preferable, however, to use a commercially available small animal closed collection system. All components of the system should be handled in a sterile fashion.
Image of (Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau)
(Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau) (Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau)
Image of (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
(Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol) (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
Image of (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
(Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol) (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
Image of (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
(Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol) (Courtesy of the Feline Centre, Langford Veterinary Services, University of Bristol)
Image of (Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau)
(Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau) (Courtesy of the Feline Advisory Bureau)

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