1887

Preventive healthcare: a life-stage approach

image of Preventive healthcare: a life-stage approach
GBP
Online Access: GBP25.00 + VAT
BSAVA Library Pass Buy a pass

Abstract

The current approach to feline wellness care includes a focus on six specific life stages to assess risk factors and specific age-related healthcare needs. These life stages, with relevant health problems and issues, can be summarized as: kitten (birth to 6 months), junior (7 months to 2 years), prime (3 to 6 years), mature (7 to 10 years), senior (11 to 14 years) and geriatric (15 years and older). This chapter considers general preventive healthcare recommendations. : Calculation of energy requirements for life stages and weight management; Prepubertal neutering of kittens; Prepubertal neutering of males; Prepubertal neutering of females; Compassionate euthanasia.

Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap2

Figures

Image of 2.1
2.1 This 10-year-old cat has a visibly enlarged thyroid gland. Not all cats with hyperthyroidism have such obvious gland enlargements; palpation of the thyroid gland should be a routine part of the examination for all cats from about the age of 7 years to facilitate early disease detection.
Image of 2.4
2.4 Recommendations by life stage for tests to be carried out for a minimum database. Green = recommended; yellow = optional; red = not recommended. (Adapted from .)
Image of 2.5
2.5 DNA tests for genetic diseases and various traits are becoming more commonly available. This cat is having a DNA sample collected using a cytology brush to harvest cheek cells; ordinary cotton tip applicators (cotton buds) work just as well. This Maine Coon cat is being tested for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy risk.
Image of 2.6
2.6 Both permanent and visible identification should be provided for all cats. This kitten is receiving a microchip at the time of spay surgery. Even indoor cats should be identified in case of escape or loss.
Image of 2.7
2.7 Safe access to the outdoors can increase mental stimulation and provide a source of environmental enrichment. This cat has been trained to walk on a leash. (Courtesy Heather MacDonald.)
Image of 2.8
2.8 Cats that live totally indoors need places to sleep, climb, perch and hide. Ideal ‘cat trees’ are tall and sturdy, and provide multiple levels for one cat at a time to perch. Situating a ‘cat tree’ in front of a window provides opportunities for bird watching.
Image of 2.9
2.9 One component of environmental enrichment for indoor cats is providing stimulating toys and play opportunities. Many cats like toys that mimic birds. Other opportunities to play and explore can be very simple, such as a cardboard box.
Image of 2.13
2.13 Cats may be boarded at a boarding cattery or at other boarding facilities, such as veterinary hospitals, for various reasons. These represent higher risk situations for infectious diseases than the home environment, so that core vaccinations should be up to date before entering the facility.
Image of 2.15
2.15 Ticks are most commonly found on the head and neck.
Image of 2.16
2.16 This skin scraping was taken from a pruritic cat infected with FIV. Numerous long slender mites (such as the one arrowed in this field) were found and identified as .
Image of 2.22
2.22 Food balls or food puzzles can be used to encourage natural foraging behaviours and expenditure of energy in pursuit of food. Many types are available, and owners may need to experiment to find one that their cat will interact with.
Image of 2.23
2.23 An alarming number of pet cats are overweight or obese. Prevention of obesity starts early in life, around the time of surgical sterilization. Cats should be weighed and body condition scored (see Figure 1.20) at every opportunity.
Image of 2.24
2.24 This cat litter box, a converted plastic dish-washing bowl, is smaller than the recommended size of 1.5 times the length of the cat. Commercially available litter boxes are also often too small.
Image of 2.25
2.25 The primary socialization period for kittens is between 3 and 9 weeks of age. In this ‘kitten kindergarten’ class, young kittens are being taught to accept handling, are acclimating to cat carriers and car rides, and are being socialized to other people, other cats and to dogs. (Courtesy of Steve Dale)
Image of 2.26
2.26 Senior and geriatric cats often have mobility problems. Resources such as favourite beds or sleeping spots should be made accessible and should be well padded for comfort.
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of This kitten had a single scrotal testis on palpation.
This kitten had a single scrotal testis on palpation. This kitten had a single scrotal testis on palpation.
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled

More like this

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443149.chap2
dcterms_title,dcterms_description
-contentType:Journal
5
5
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error