1887

Tooth extraction

image of Tooth extraction
GBP
Online Access: GBP25.00 + VAT
BSAVA Library Pass Buy a pass

Abstract

Tooth extractions in rabbits, compared with that in dogs and cats, is complicated by the anatomy of the mouth. The lips do not retract caudally nearly as far as in carnivores, so it is difficult to see all the surfaces of the teeth. This chapter considers the relevant anatomy; indications for extraction; instruments for tooth extraction; incisor extraction; cheek tooth extraction; and complications. : Incisor extraction; Cheek tooth extraction: intraoral approach; Cheek tooth extraction: mandibular extraoral approach.

Preview this chapter:
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443163.chap27

Figures

Image of 27.1
27.1 Access to the incisors is relatively straightforward, but access to the cheek teeth in rabbits can be a challenge for both visualization and access. These incisors show various stages of the progressive syndrome of acquired dental disease (PSADD; see Chapter 24). One crown has fractured beneath the gingiva, one is growing in a distorted shape and the others have stopped growing.
Image of 27.3
27.3 Malocclusion in rabbits can result in repeated overgrowth of the incisors, and extraction is indicated.
Image of 27.4
27.4 In this rabbit, the upper left premolar has tilted obliquely sufficiently to grow out laterally, causing regular trauma to the buccal mucosa. These teeth often become mobile, increasing the discomfort; there is evidence of occlusion with its mandibular counterpart on the tooth’s palatal aspect. This tooth was extracted intraorally.
Image of 27.5
27.5 In this rabbit the last cheek tooth is tilted distally. It is contacting the mucosa at the back of the mouth, and should be removed.
Image of 27.6
27.6 Wooden tongue depressors, metal rodent dental spatula, and various sizes and designs of molar luxators.
Image of 27.7
27.7 Crossley molar luxator.
Image of 27.8
27.8 Crossley molar forceps.
Image of The patient is in lateral recumbency, with its head restrained manually by the surgeon, facilitating achievement of the angles necessary to sever the periodontal ligament.
The patient is in lateral recumbency, with its head restrained manually by the surgeon, facilitating achievement of the angles necessary to sever the periodontal ligament. The patient is in lateral recumbency, with its head restrained manually by the surgeon, facilitating achievement of the angles necessary to sever the periodontal ligament.
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Correct angle of extraction is vital for success. Pulling along the curvature of the long axis of the tooth is necessary.
Correct angle of extraction is vital for success. Pulling along the curvature of the long axis of the tooth is necessary. Correct angle of extraction is vital for success. Pulling along the curvature of the long axis of the tooth is necessary.
Image of Untitled
Image of There is no germinal tissue at the end of this extracted tooth.
There is no germinal tissue at the end of this extracted tooth. There is no germinal tissue at the end of this extracted tooth.
Image of Curetting the socket.
Curetting the socket. Curetting the socket.
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Crosley molar luxator tip.
Crosley molar luxator tip. Crosley molar luxator tip.
Image of Bent needle.
Bent needle. Bent needle.
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of While the clinical and reserve crowns are perpendicular to the jaw bone in the mandible, the maxillary teeth are angled mesially, and this needs to be taken into account when severing the periodontal ligaments.
While the clinical and reserve crowns are perpendicular to the jaw bone in the mandible, the maxillary teeth are angled mesially, and this needs to be taken into account when severing the periodontal ligaments. While the clinical and reserve crowns are perpendicular to the jaw bone in the mandible, the maxillary teeth are angled mesially, and this needs to be taken into account when severing the periodontal ligaments.
Image of The ventral aspect of the mandible has been clipped and scrubbed. (Rostral is to the left of the picture; caudal to the right.)
The ventral aspect of the mandible has been clipped and scrubbed. (Rostral is to the left of the picture; caudal to the right.) The ventral aspect of the mandible has been clipped and scrubbed. (Rostral is to the left of the picture; caudal to the right.)
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled
Image of Untitled

More like this

/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443163.chap27
dcterms_title,dcterms_description
-contentType:Journal
5
5
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error