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Hyperthyroidism and the feline kidney

image of Hyperthyroidism and the feline kidney
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Abstract

Hyperthyroidism is a common condition of senior and geriatric cats that is present in 6% of cats over the age of nine years old. Similarly chronic kidney disease is common in old cats, hence it is not uncommon for cats with CKD to have concurrent hyperthyroidism, and . This chapter includes sections on hyperthyroidism and chronic kidney disease in cats; systemic effects of hyperthyroidism; systemic effects of treatment of hyperthyroidism; effect of iatrogenic hypothyroidism on renal function; predictors of the development of azotaemia following treatment of hyperthyroid cats; and management of hyperthyroid cats with concurrent, or masked, CKD. Cat with polydipsia, diarrhoea and weight loss; Cat with weight loss and polyphagia; Cat with polydipsia, polyphagia and diarrhoea

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Figures

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17.1 Serum creatinine concentrations in 24 hyperthyroid cats before and 1, 3 and 6 months after they were treated with radioactive iodine. The horizontal bars show the mean and 95% confidence intervals; the reference interval for creatinine is shown in grey. (Reproduced from with permission from the )
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17.2 Kaplan–Meier survival curves for 47 cats treated for hyperthyroidism that were euthyroid after 6 months of treatment. The cats were grouped according to whether or not they were azotaemic at the end of the 6-month follow-up period and survival curves were plotted for each group (azotaemic and non-azotaemic). Circles represent censored individuals. There was no significant difference in the survival time of euthyroid azotaemic and non-azotaemic cats. (Reproduced from with permission from the )
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17.3 Kaplan–Meier survival curves for 28 cats treated for hyperthyroidism that were classified as hypothyroid after 6 months of treatment (based on documentation of a low serum total thyroxine (TT4) concentration and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration). The cats were grouped according to whether or not they were azotaemic at the end of the 6-month follow-up period and survival curves were plotted for each group (azotaemic and non-azotaemic). Circles represent censored individuals. Hypothyroid azotaemic cats had significantly shorter survival times than hypothyroid non-azotaemic cats. (Reproduced from with permission from the )
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17.4 Recommended approach to the initial management of cats with hyperthyroidism and concurrent or masked chronic kidney disease (CKD). IRIS = International Renal Interest Society; TT4 = total thyroxine; USG = urine specific gravity.

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