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Freshwater aquaria

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Abstract

Keeping fish in an aquarium is a popular pastime around the world. Freshwater aquaria may be divided on the basis of the temperature of the water they contain. This chapter examines the requirements in setting up and maintaining a freshwater aquarium such as tanks, captive species, aquarium maintenance and holidays.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443538.chap6

Figures

Image of Figure 6.1
Figure 6.1 Goldfish bowls are only suitable for a few small fish. Severe fluctuations in water quality may result from the lack of filtration. The bowls should be only partially filled with water, so as to provide a greater surface area for gas exchange.
Image of Figure 6.2
Figure 6.2 Showpiece tropical freshwater aquarium. These are often heavily stocked with a variety of fish species and plants to simulate a natural environment. Regular maintenance and efficient filtration systems are required to ensure good water quality. (© W.H. Wildgoose.)
Image of Figure 6.3
Figure 6.3 Foam filter. (a) These basic systems use a stream of fine air bubbles to draw water gently through the foam cartridge and through the uplift tube to the top of the aquarium. (b) A commercially produced foam filter is connected to an air pump by an airline. (© W.H. Wildgoose.) Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Figure 6.4
Figure 6.4 Undergravel filter. (a) Water is drawn through a gravel bed and into a void beneath the perforated plate by a current created from a stream of rising air bubbles in the uplift tube. (b) This commercially available unit has a small cartridge containing activated carbon at the top of the uplift tube. (© W.H. Wildgoose.) Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Figure 6.5
Figure 6.5 Gravel cleaner. The wide-bore tube is attached to a length of tubing and uses a siphon principle to remove light sediment and mulm from the bottom of the aquarium. This unit is self-priming and has a loose plastic flap that acts as a one-way valve. (© W.H. Wildgoose.) Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Figure 6.6
Figure 6.6 Power filter. (a) An electric pump draws water through the media. The inner compartments can be filled with one or more types of medium. (b) An external unit, disassembled to show the lid with integral pump, the three chambers for the filter media and the outer casing. (Courtesy of Wildwoods Ltd, © W.H. Wildgoose.)
Image of Figure 6.7
Figure 6.7 Hang-on filter. (a) The unit hooks on to the wall of the aquarium. Water is drawn up through the inlet pipe, into the pump chamber, then around the back into the filter box. Water permeates through the disposable carbon filter pads and returns to the tank over the outlet flap. (b) A double-chambered hang-on filter unit for home aquaria. (Courtesy of Tetra, © W.H. Wildgoose.) Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
Image of Figure 6.8
Figure 6.8 Trickle filter. Discus are often considered difficult fish and are frequently kept in sparsely furnished tanks. They require very specific and stable water conditions, namely soft acidic warm water. In this system, water is pumped into a homemade trickle filter that is situated above the main tank. (© W.H. Wildgoose.)
Image of Figure 6.9
Figure 6.9 Common freshwater species suitable for home aquaria: (a) cardinal tetra; (b) guppy; (c) discus; (d) goldfish.

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