1887
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  • ISSN: 2041-2487
  • E-ISSN: 2041-2495
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Abstract

Matt-James.gif , an ECVN board-eligible clinician in neurology and neurosurgery at Dovecote Veterinary Hospital, focuses on vestibular disease, one of the most commonly encountered neurological problems in dogs and cats.

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/content/journals/10.22233/20412495.0124.10
2024-01-01
2024-07-22
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VIDEO 1: A dog with vestibular ataxia; leaning and falling predominantly to the left

There is also a left-sided head tilt.

VIDEO 2: Spontaneous horizontal nystagmus with fast phase to the right in a cat

In this case the lesion localization would typically be to the left vestibular system (slow phase towards the side of the lesion).

VIDEO 3: A dog with bilateral vestibular disease displaying a crouched, wide-based stance and reluctance to move

There are also wide head excursions from one side to the other.

Answers to How to approach vestibular disease reflection questions

  • Published online : 01 Jan 2024
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