1887
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  • ISSN: 2041-2487
  • E-ISSN: 2041-2495
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Abstract

Cole-Laura.gif Cook-Simon-SMALL.gif Following on from last month’s article on thoracic point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS), Laura Cole and Simon Cook, of the Emergency and Critical Care Department at the Royal Veterinary College, discuss how POCUS can be used to evaluate abdominal emergencies.

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/content/journals/10.22233/20412495.1118.10
2018-11-01
2022-01-17
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.22233/20412495.1118.10
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VIDEO 1: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (A) Free fluid at the diaphragmaticohepatic site.

VIDEO 2: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (B) Free fluid at the splenorenal site.

VIDEO 3: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (C) Free fluid at the cystocolic site.

VIDEO 4: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (D) Free fluid at the hepatorenal site.

VIDEO 5: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (E) Echogenic free fluid at the cystocolic site.

VIDEO 6: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (F) Gall bladder 'halo sign'. Note the hypoechoic tissue layer between two hyperechoic layers in the gall bladder wall.

VIDEO 7: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (G) Renal pelvic dilatation.

VIDEO 8: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (H) Fluid filled amotile stomach.

VIDEO 9: Abdominal point-of-care ultrasonography (I) Longitudinal view of the aorta (top) and vena cava (bottom) at the paralumbar site in M-mode.

  • Published online : 01 Nov 2018
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