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Rodents: biology, husbandry and clinical techniques in more unusual pet species

image of Rodents: biology, husbandry and clinical techniques in more unusual pet species
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Abstract

This chapter discusses biology, husbandry and clinical techniques in more unusual pet species such as chipmunks, duprasi and prairie dog. For each species the chapter considers Natural habit and biology; Captive husbandry and diet; Handling and restraint; Diagnostic approach; Common conditions; Behavioural problems; Anaesthesia and analgesia; and Common surgical procedures.

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Figures

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9.1 Eastern American chipmunk () prior to release back into the wild.
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9.2 Captive pet chipmunk ( ()). (Courtesy of Emma Keeble.)
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9.4 Typical chipmunk housing. (Courtesy of Emma Keeble.)
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9.5 Most chipmunks resent handling. Leather gloves may be worn, but they are cumbersome and do not always allow the dexterity and sensitivity needed to restrain chipmunks safely. (Courtesy of Emma Keeble.)
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9.8 Duprasi (fat-tailed gerbil) (). (© Jackie Roswell.)
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9.11 Prairie dog () showing typical defensive posture.
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9.13 Trigonal anal sacs. These are a unique anatomical feature of prairie dogs.
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9.16 Prairie dog with fractured mandibular incisor tooth. These injuries arecommonly seen in pet animals.

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