1887

Patients with ocular disease

image of Patients with ocular disease
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Abstract

In any patient with ocular injury or ill health, preserving vision and, perhaps even more importantly, reducing ocular pain must be the prime objectives. The veterinary practice has the opportunity to deal with patients in a holistic manner so that, even if appropriate treatment for the ocular condition is not immediately available, pain relief can be given and an appropriate environment arranged if the animal’s sight is impaired, even as referral to a veterinary ophthalmologist is being arranged. Corneal ulceration in a dog; Glaucoma in a dog.

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Figures

Image of Bilateral corneal disease with dry eye.
Bilateral corneal disease with dry eye. Bilateral corneal disease with dry eye.
Image of How to administer eyedrops to a dog. 1. Open the dog’s upper and lower eyelids with one hand. 2. Tilt the dog’s head back. 3. Apply one drop only on to the eye surface with the other hand. NB More than one drop increases reflex tearing, washing out medication and lowering its efficacy. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall)
How to administer eyedrops to a dog. 1. Open the dog’s upper and lower eyelids with one hand. 2. Tilt the dog’s head back. 3. Apply one drop only on to the eye surface with the other hand. NB More than one drop increases reflex tearing, washing out medication and lowering its efficacy. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall) How to administer eyedrops to a dog. 1. Open the dog’s upper and lower eyelids with one hand. 2. Tilt the dog’s head back. 3. Apply one drop only on to the eye surface with the other hand. NB More than one drop increases reflex tearing, washing out medication and lowering its efficacy. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall)
Image of The glaucomatous eye on presentation, showing pupillary dilatation and episcleral engorgement.
The glaucomatous eye on presentation, showing pupillary dilatation and episcleral engorgement. The glaucomatous eye on presentation, showing pupillary dilatation and episcleral engorgement.
Image of The eye 30 minutes after topical administration of latanoprost. There was miosis of the pupil and a reduction in IOP from 52 mmHg to 22 mmHg.
The eye 30 minutes after topical administration of latanoprost. There was miosis of the pupil and a reduction in IOP from 52 mmHg to 22 mmHg. The eye 30 minutes after topical administration of latanoprost. There was miosis of the pupil and a reduction in IOP from 52 mmHg to 22 mmHg.
Image of The patient should be approached gently from the non-blind side. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall)
The patient should be approached gently from the non-blind side. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall) The patient should be approached gently from the non-blind side. (Courtesy of Rachel Lumbis and Catherine Kendall)

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