1887

Raptors: systemic and non-infectious diseases

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Abstract

Birds of prey have become well known for their susceptibility to environmental contaminants. A dramatic drop in the populations of some raptor species during the 1960s and 70s alerted the world to this problem and since then many of the substances responsible have been banned. This chapters assesses poisoning, oncology, cardiovascular disease, nephrology, hepatic disease; and incoordination and fits.

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Figures

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26.2 This radiograph of the heart and lung of a roe deer shot with a single bullet shows multiple lead pieces distributed throughout its tissues. Thus, animals killed by shooting, of whatever type, should not be used to feed raptors. (Courtesy of A. Valentin)
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26.3 Goshawk demonstrating hind limb paresis due to lead poisoning. Lead toxicity in a Peregrine Falcon. Note the posture, sitting on the ‘hocks’ with feet clenched. (a, courtesy of Neil Forbes; b, © John Chitty)
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26.4 Radiograph demonstrating lead in the proventriculus of a Saker Falcon. (Courtesy of Jaime Samour)
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26.5 Proventricular gavage in a Goshawk to remove lead shot.
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26.7 An infiltrating lipoma involving the carpus of a Saker Falcon. (Courtesy of Jaime Samour)
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26.8 Atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of a Peregrine Falcon. (Courtesy of Pat Redig and Arno Wunschmann)
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26.9 Visceral gout: urate crystals on the pericardium and liver capsule on post-mortem examination of a hybrid falcon. (Courtesy of Jaime Samour)
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26.10 Radiograph demonstrating marked hepatomegaly/ascites and loss of the normal hourglass shape of the cardiohepatic silhouette. (Courtesy of Jaime Samour)
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26.12 Peregrine Falcon exhibiting seizures. (Courtesy of Tom Bailey)
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26.13 A rolled-up towel is used to support this collapsed European Kestrel.

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