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Neurological and musculoskeletal disorders

image of Neurological and musculoskeletal disorders
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Abstract

Musculoskeletal and neurological diseases are extremely common in poultry and often cause similar signs. This chapter provides a synopsis of the common diseases encountered in veterinary practice, and covers related soft tissue and nutritional disorders.

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/content/chapter/10.22233/9781910443194.chap18

Figures

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18.1 Unilateral limb paresis is typical of Marek’s disease in chickens. (© J Chitty)
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18.2 Neurological signs of encephalitis in chicks due to infection. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.4 Mycotoxicosis and/or aspergillosis in chicks. Note the similar presentation to chicks with infection (see Figure 18.2 ). A post-mortem examination and histopathology are often required to differentiate the aetiology. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.6 Chondrodystrophy in a turkey secondary to infection. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.7 Femoral head necrosis. (© of Shane Raidal)
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18.8 Hen with osteomyelitis. Without a thorough examination and potentially radiographs of the affected area, this condition cannot easily be differentiated from Marek’s disease, viral arthritis, joint infections, rickets due to calcium or vitamin D deficiency, musculoskeletal trauma, riboflavin and thiamine deficiency, reticuloendotheliosis and Newcastle disease. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.9 Bumblefoot. A large, proliferative scab is present centrally in the palmar aspect of the foot. There is surrounding swelling, and removal of the scab is likely to reveal a caseous core. If the tissue is very unhealthy, bleeding can be minimal, but as healing begins, debridement is likely to result in more bleeding. Bandaging is often required, to keep the lesion clean, to remove pressure from the healing tissue and to provide haemostasis. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.11 Classic stance of a chick with thiamine deficiency. (© Professor Amir Noormohammadi, University of Melbourne)
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18.12 Brains of chickens with vitamin E deficiency. (© Shane Raidal)
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18.13 White muscle disease as a result of vitamin E deficiency. (© Shane Raidal)

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