1887

Disorders of the paw

image of Disorders of the paw
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Abstract

While it is possible for skin lesions to affect the paws exclusively, it is more common to have involvement of other areas as well. This chapter concentrates on those conditions that affect the feet and nails predominantly or exclusively. This chapter covers foot and footpad injuries, skin disorders affecting the paws and nail disorders. : Applying a foot bandage; Toe amputation; Dew claw removal under general anaesthesia.

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Figures

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29.1 A laceration of the stopper pad in a 3-year-old cross-breed dog. (Courtesy of Rebecca Bailey)
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29.2 Vigorous exercise on hard surfaces (especially if protruding flints) can lead to shaving injuries to the pads, as in this collie cross. Healing is by the pad growing out to provide a new layer of dead surface. Clients should be warned that this is a slow process. (Courtesy of Helen Redfern)
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29.3 Road traffic accidents often lead to degloving injuries, as in this Whippet. With careful bandaging even large deficits can heal well by second intention. (Courtesy of Emma Hall)
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29.4 Penetrating foreign bodies, such as this thorn in the pad of a young German Shepherd Dog, are common in practice. (Courtesy of Helen Redfern)
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29.5 The same dog as in Figure 29.1 . Following prompt cleaning, the wound was closed and left to heal by first intention. (Courtesy of Rebecca Bailey)
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29.6 Far–far–near–near suture pattern. Note that the initial course of the suture material is below the base of the laceration. Drawn by S.J. Elmhurst BA Hons (www.livingart.org.uk) and reproduced with her permission.
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29.7 Atopic dermatitis. There is erythema and hair loss affecting the carpus and foot.
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29.8 Contact dermatitis. There is erythema on the ventral surface of the paw and there was moderate pruritus. The signs were reduced by avoiding some grass areas.
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29.9 (subgen. ) mites visible in the interdigital area.
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29.10 Demodicosis. Note the alopecic areas with scaling.
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29.11 Interdigital spaces are common sites for foreign bodies, especially grass awns. Long hair will trap the awn, which can migrate into the foot and lead to abscessation, as in this 4-year-old terrier. Alternatively, penetration may be from the palmar aspect and present as an interdigital swelling, as in this 6-year-old Labrador Retriever. (Courtesy of Rebecca Bailey)
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29.12 Histiocytoma in a young cross-breed dog. A raised dome-shaped lesion with some surface trauma is present on the paw. Surgery to remove this was successful.
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29.13 Hyperkeratosis of the footpad in an 11-year-old Cocker Spaniel.
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29.14 A corn is visible as a pale mass in the centre of the pad of this Lurcher. Hulling was carried out using a dental elevator.
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29.15 Traumatic nail injury following a car accident. The outer nail shell has been lost, exposing the sensitive ‘quick’. Appearance following removal of the quick with bone cutters.
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29.16 Early infection of the nail and nailbed. Notice the brown discoloration at the base of the nail.
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Image of Diagrammatic representation of dorsal and plantar/palmar incisions for digit amputation. For ease of interpretation this shows removal of the 3rd digit. It should be noted, however, that the possibility of a degree of lameness must be explained to the owner if either the 3rd or 4th digit is to be removed.
Diagrammatic representation of dorsal and plantar/palmar incisions for digit amputation. For ease of interpretation this shows removal of the 3rd digit. It should be noted, however, that the possibility of a degree of lameness must be explained to the owner if either the 3rd or 4th digit is to be removed. Diagrammatic representation of dorsal and plantar/palmar incisions for digit amputation. For ease of interpretation this shows removal of the 3rd digit. It should be noted, however, that the possibility of a degree of lameness must be explained to the owner if either the 3rd or 4th digit is to be removed.
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Image of This cross-bred dog has double dew claws on its hindleg.
This cross-bred dog has double dew claws on its hindleg. This cross-bred dog has double dew claws on its hindleg.
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Image of Wound following removal of 3rd phalanx and nail, showing the end of the 2nd phalangeal bone and the footpad flap.
Wound following removal of 3rd phalanx and nail, showing the end of the 2nd phalangeal bone and the footpad flap. Wound following removal of 3rd phalanx and nail, showing the end of the 2nd phalangeal bone and the footpad flap.
Image of Removed nail and 3rd phalanx. These can be sent for histology.
Removed nail and 3rd phalanx. These can be sent for histology. Removed nail and 3rd phalanx. These can be sent for histology.
Image of Coaptation of wound edges with subcuticular sutures of 2 metric (3/0 USP) polyglactin 910.
Coaptation of wound edges with subcuticular sutures of 2 metric (3/0 USP) polyglactin 910. Coaptation of wound edges with subcuticular sutures of 2 metric (3/0 USP) polyglactin 910.
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