1887

Respiratory disease in the cat in the shelter environment

image of Respiratory disease in the cat in the shelter environment
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Abstract

It is important for veterinary surgeons to have a good understanding of feline infectious respiratory disease, since it represents a continual challenge in the shelter environment. This chapter covers: the challenge of the shelter environment, history taking, differential diagnosis, treatment, potential sequelae, prevention, outbreak management and FCV-associated virulent systemic disease. Rehoming a snotty cat.

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Figures

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15.4 Cat with a lingual ulcer, typical of feline calicivirus infection.
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15.5 Oropharyngeal swab being taken from a cat.
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15.6 Cat with nasal and ocular discharges associated with feline herpesvirus infection.
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15.7 Ocular signs caused by may begin unilaterally, later progressing to become bilateral.
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15.9 Cats in quarantine.
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15.10 Cats may benefit from access to runs where they can see the outside environment.
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15.11 Cat accommodation block with an impervious, easy-to-clean floor.
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15.12 Individual cat accommodation. Surfaces should be easy to clean.
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15.13 Shelters should be able to isolate cats showing signs of infectious disease in a separate accommodation area, away from other groups of cats.
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15.14 Sneeze barriers (e.g. made of glass or Perspex) can help to reduce droplet transmission of pathogens.
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15.15 Example of cleaning/feeding groups of cats in order of disease susceptibility.
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15.16 Hand hygiene is an essential part of any biosecurity programme.
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15.17 Example of an epidemic curve.
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15.18 Management of cat movements during an outbreak of FURTD.
Image of Lingual ulceration typical of FCV infection. FCV = feline calicivirus.
Lingual ulceration typical of FCV infection. FCV = feline calicivirus. Lingual ulceration typical of FCV infection. FCV = feline calicivirus.
Image of FURTD is often milder with FCV than FHV infection but the clinical signs are not pathognomonic. FCV = feline calicivirus; FHV = feline herpesvirus.
FURTD is often milder with FCV than FHV infection but the clinical signs are not pathognomonic. FCV = feline calicivirus; FHV = feline herpesvirus. FURTD is often milder with FCV than FHV infection but the clinical signs are not pathognomonic. FCV = feline calicivirus; FHV = feline herpesvirus.
Image of Clinical signs typical of FHV infection. (a) Anterior synechiae; (b) facial lesions. (b, © Rachel Dean)
Clinical signs typical of FHV infection. (a) Anterior synechiae; (b) facial lesions. (b, © Rachel Dean) Clinical signs typical of FHV infection. (a) Anterior synechiae; (b) facial lesions. (b, © Rachel Dean)
Image of C. felis infection can cause (a) chemosis in the early stages and (b) chronic conjunctivitis that can last for months.
C. felis infection can cause (a) chemosis in the early stages and (b) chronic conjunctivitis that can last for months. infection can cause (a) chemosis in the early stages and (b) chronic conjunctivitis that can last for months. (a, © Rachel Dean)
Image of Preparing prospective owners when rehoming a cat recovering from FURTD.
Preparing prospective owners when rehoming a cat recovering from FURTD. Preparing prospective owners when rehoming a cat recovering from FURTD.

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